Liver cancer in Southeast Asia and beyond

Rose Li, a physician scientist at the University of California, San Francisco, explains how her work on the Mutographs project is helping to understand the causes of liver cancer, a condition that affects a large number of people in China and Southeast Asia.  My father was born in a poor rice paddy village in Southern […]

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The curious case of oesophageal cancer

Cases of oesophageal cancer have an unusual pattern across the world. Some very specific regions can have a large numbers of cases but neighbouring regions have very few people affected. Here, Dariush Nesheli from IARC explains how researchers are working to uncover the reasons why this happens. Mutational signatures can be thought of as signs […]

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The life of a Mutographs scientist

My name is Sarah, and I am a scientist in Mike Stratton’s group working on the Mutographs project. I have been working on this project for just over a year now, and as you will have read in the previous blog post, it has been a very busy year! I work mainly on work area […]

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What did we achieve on Mutographs in 2018?

Mutographs project manager Laura Humphreys reflects on what the project has achieved in 2018, and highlights what the team will be up to in 2019. The last year has been great for the Mutographs team, with progress being made across all areas of the project. We were also busy outside of the lab as we […]

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How can artificial intelligence help us identify causes of cancer?

Phoebe He, a scientist in the Alexandrov Lab at the University of California San Diego, explains how machine learning and artificial intelligence are crucial to the work of the Mutographs project. The Mutographs project is based around the study of mutational signatures. These signatures describe patterns of changes, known as mutations, in the DNA of […]

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Bringing Mutographs to life for shoppers in Cambridge

Mutographs scientist Tim Butler explains how researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute developed an activity to showcase the work of the Mutographs team to shoppers in Cambridge. In September 2018 some of us on the Sanger Mutographs team had the pleasure of participating in the ‘Life Lab’ event. This is part of European Researchers’ Night, […]

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How can mini-organs help us to understand cancer?

Hear more from Maggie and Mimi about how growing mini-organs in the lab will help us to understand DNA signatures. One of the great things about the Mutographs project is that we are using lots of different ways to explore the role of DNA signatures in cancer. One of the most exciting techniques being used […]

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What does a mutational signature look like?

In the Mutographs project, we are investigating signatures that are left in DNA by lifestyle and environmental factors. These signatures are formed of changes to DNA known as “mutations”, which is why we call them “mutational signatures”. But what does a mutational signature look like? What information can these signatures tell us? Read on to […]

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Oesophageal cancer in Kenya

In February 2018, patient advocates Mimi McCord and Maggie Blanks and journalist and author Kat Arney travelled to Eldoret, Kenya, where samples are being collected for the Mutographs project. In this guest post, Kat explains why they went there and what they discovered about oesophageal cancer in East Africa. This is an edited version of […]

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Sanger scientists win £20 million ‘Grand Challenge’ funding from Cancer Research UK

Professor Sir Mike Stratton will lead an international team to help transform our understanding of what causes cancer Wellcome Sanger Institute researchers have landed one of the biggest funding grants ever awarded by Cancer Research UK. The charity is set to invest £20 million over the next five years in a ground-breaking research project led […]

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